Spotlight

What
do people think about their property rights?
What do people think about their property rights?

Learn about the first-ever global effort to measure how secure people feel about their homes and land.

March 30, 2017

One in four people are worried about losing their home against their will in the next five years, according to a nine-country survey conducted by Gallup. The survey is part of an unprecedented effort called the Global Property Rights Index (PRIndex) which aims to understand whether people perceive their land and property rights to be secure, and why. 

Until now, perceptions of land and property rights have remained a critical data gap for the land and property rights community, preventing a clear understanding of the magnitude and nature of citizens’ experience of security and insecurity. The overview below shares key findings from the latest survey and what’s next for PRIndex.

This overview is available to download here

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